Monthly Archives: January 2024

The Scientific Method and Critical Thinking

What I see is government-funded scientists forgetting the progress in scientific thought in the 19th century, especially Germany. Hermann Helmholtz, about the most noteworthy denounced the way Goethe and Hegel and Aristotle processed scientific thought. Aristotle, unquestionably one of the … Continue reading

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SCIENTIFIC AUTOBIOGRAPHY

I received an invitation in July 2022 — to write “my scientific autobiography,” to be published in the 2024 issue of Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology (APRT). The rules involved a “20-page maximum, which should include proposed figures and … Continue reading

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A Mammalian DNA Methylation Landscape

As this GEITP group has discussed numerous times, each person’s overall genetic architecture (landscape) represents the combination of differences in our: [a] genetics (e.g., DNA sequence changes); [b] epigenetics (chromosomal but not involving DNA sequence); [c] environmental effects (cigarette smoking, … Continue reading

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Power of inclusion: Enhancing polygenic prediction with admixed individuals (simplified)

I apologize. Yesterday’s GEITP blog was regarded by some “as a bit difficult to understand” (i.e., “more basic background” is needed, please). So, here goes: For more than two decades, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have unequivocally shown that common complex … Continue reading

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Power of inclusion: Enhancing polygenic prediction with admixed individuals

Polygenic scores (PGSs) are used for combining genetic effects into the individual-level genetic liability of diseases or non-disease traits (e.g., risk of type-2 diabetes or schizophrenia; risk of lung cancer as a function of cigarettes smoked, or skin cancer as … Continue reading

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