Category Archives: Center for Environmental Genetics

Single-molecule regulatory architectures — as captured by chromatin-fiber sequencing

Any trait (phenotype) reflects the contribution of genes (i.e. DNA sequence), epigenetic factors (chromosomal events other than DNA sequence: DNA methylation, RNA interference, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling), environmental effects (diet, lifestyle), endogenous influences (e.g. cardiopulmonary disorders, kidney disease), and each … Continue reading

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Genomic scans for adaptive introgression, using a new method, that authors call “VolcanoFinder”

These GEITP pages have often discussed the topic of evolution of humans, including “adaptive introgression” (i.e. the process by which beneficial alleles are introduced into a species from a closely-related species). [Recall that ‘allele’ is a gene on one chromosome; … Continue reading

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THE HIGH COST OF COLLEGE: IS IT WORTH IT?

Because what the COVID-19 pandemic has done to U.S. education — from preschool through college — it seems like a good time to examine closely where education has gone, and what might happen in the future. WHY is this thorough … Continue reading

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Evolutionary origins of flowering plants and their pollinators

The topic in these GEITP pages today is “the rise and early diversity of flowering plants” (angiosperms). Darwin described the seemingly explosive diversification of angiosperms — as an “abominable mystery.” Today, debates continue about the origin, and the processes that … Continue reading

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Using information theory to decode network co-evolution of insect-plant ecosystems

This topic is central to the GEITP theme of gene-environment interactions. The “environmental signal” is a chemical(s) emitted (by a plant or an insect), and “genes” in the genome (of the insect or plant) respond to that signal. “Attracting” or … Continue reading

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Why herd immunity theshold to COVID-19 is reached much earlier than thought – update

EARLIER POST HERE: Thank you, M. The time-line for number of COVID-19-related deaths [see figure below] is also very intriguing — in a country that never imposed any restrictions — no face masks, children stayed in school, and the economy … Continue reading

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Persistent warm Mediterranean surface waters during the Roman period

For those GEITP-ers that remain enthusiastic about “global warming”, here is a semi-lay summary of an article that reently appeared in Sci Reports [Nature]. This is evidence of global warming — except this occurred 1500 to 2000 years ago.   … Continue reading

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Toward development of the proteome landscape for the kingdoms of life

Early on, in genetic studies, the concept (learned in grade school, these days 😊) was that “DNA is transcribed into RNA, which is translated into protein.” Then, it became established that “DNA —> primary transcript, which then results in messenger-RNA … Continue reading

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Mapping and characterization of structural variants (SVs) in 17,795 human genomes

As the previous GEITP pages email described, in the early days of genetic studies, the concept (learned in grade school 😊) was that “DNA is transcribed into RNA, which is translated into protein.” Then, it was established that “DNA —> … Continue reading

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Osteocalcin promotes bone mineralization but is not a hormone

Today’s topic in these GEITP pages is an excellent example of controversial conclusions (over more than two decades) able to be overturned by additional experiments; this is an example of how rigorous science is supposed to correct itself. Osteocalcin (OCN) … Continue reading

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