Author Archives: DWN

Eicosanoid profile rapidly changes when cells are cultured in a dish

As these GEITP pages have discussed a number of times, gene-environment interactions are best studied (in vivo) in the intact animal (or in clinical studies, i.e. in humans). Many labs study a biological model system in an isolated organ or … Continue reading

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The FUNGUS tells the ANT what to do and when to do it ?????

Evolution of life on Earth is usually DIVERGENT, i.e. one starts from a simple string of genes, A-C-E, which evolves (by gene duplications, inversions, insertions, deletions, rearrangments) into something more complex such as A-B-C-D-E. On the other hand, CONVERGENT evolution … Continue reading

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High altitude may have driven DNA mutation in FBN1 gene to cause short stature

Because genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are being performed with larger and larger numbers of individuals (cohorts), increasing numbers of small-effect genes (genotype) are becoming identified. Each of these genes are associated (statistically significantly) with the trait (phenotype) of “height.” At … Continue reading

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What makes a “good scientist?” Nine pitfalls of research misconduct

What makes a “good scientist?” Attached is a 3-page editorial on this topic. One of the coauthors teaches leader­ship skills and works with “troubled departments”. Toxic research environments share a handful of operational flaws and cognitive biases. Researchers and institutional … Continue reading

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Comment: One of the Most Widely Used Methods in Epigenetics Can Cause Misleading Results

Dear Dr. Nebert, this is a very interesting paper – thank you. I agree with the authors, for most part. In addition to the weakness that they reported, I think DIP-seq has its inherent drawbacks. Without bisulfite modification, the methylation … Continue reading

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How the LNT Model became the default model for cancer risk assessment — based on a published study that likely was never peer-reviewed

These two very recent publications [see attached] are the latest in a long series –– on the topic of the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) Model, which (since about 2o11) has been carefully dissected historically by Ed Calabrese (School of Public Health, … Continue reading

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One of the Most Widely Used Methods in Epigenetics Can Cause Misleading Results

We also learned a similar lesson regarding artifacts through the history of proteomics technologies –– particularly from protein-interactions studies that rely on immunoprecipitation as the first step. This ultimately led to a database of “usual suspects” that was later more … Continue reading

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One of the Most Widely Used Methods in Epigenetics Can Cause Misleading Results

This BREAKTHROUGH paper (reported today in FRONTLINE GENOMICS) is very important to those in the field (e.g. Sean Zhang), so I have moved it “to the front of the QUEUE.” There is nothing worse than spending a lot of time, … Continue reading

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Moving on into a New Frontier: “3-dimensional genomics” (the way the chromosomes are situated in the nucleus)

As these GEITP pages keep harping on –– the factors that contribute to any trait (response to a drug or environmental toxicant, hair color, height, blood pressure, risk of type-2 diabetes, risk of autism spectrum disorder, etc.) include: genotype (DNA … Continue reading

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June Solar Update

This is just what my late son had been interested in, and predicting, since about 2000. (It was part of his job.) Solar activity (sunspot frequency) has become incredibly quiet during Cycles 23 and especially Cycle 24. The last time … Continue reading

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