Author Archives: DWN

Transparency and Reproducibility

This (excellently written, very timely and relevant) article by Ken Haapala was posted on the S.E.P.P. web site this week. DwN Transparency and Reproducibility By Ken Haapala, President, Science and Environmental Policy Project (SEPP) Writing for the National Association of … Continue reading

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Cracking the Code of Life—at Light Speed

Cracking the Code of Life—at Light Speed Mike Hunkapiller helped invent the DNA-sequencing machines that read the human genome. Now his company’s tools are decoding everything from insects to cancer cells. By Kyle Peterson April 27, 2018 6:03 p.m. ET … Continue reading

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Whole-exome sequencing (WES) analysis identifies importance of rare coding variants in the development of esophageal cancer

Along any chromosomal segment, the DNA is divided into genes and intergenic regions. Intergenic regions include promoters and enhancers near a gene that usually regulate the expression of that gene (but sometimes distant genes) –– as well as many other … Continue reading

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Artificial Sweeteners in Mice: Linked to Obesity and Diabetes

This is a recent article from Newsweek –– that some of you might be interested in reading. Yet-another example of gene-environment (GxE) interactions. The “Environment” in this case is artificial sweeteners. The “Gene(s)” (in some people, but not others) contribute … Continue reading

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Embryonic defects — induced by maternal obesity in mice are caused by DPPA3 insufficiency in oocytes

This topic is an intriguing gene-environment (GxE) interactions example. The “environment” in this case is maternal obesity, or maternal diet. The “genes affected” include Dppa3 (Stella) which was previously known to participate as a maternal-effect gene in mouse embryos. DPPA3 … Continue reading

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Refining type-2 diabetes (T2D) from two types — into five classifications. A more sensible clinical approach.

I predict this exciting article will become a highly-cited landmark publication –– at least in the field of DIABETES. A layman’s article on this topic was shared by all of GEITP on 2 March 2018 and it posted again [way … Continue reading

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Sickle Cell Anemia: Whole-genome-sequencing (WGS)-based haplotypes reveal a single origin of the mutation in the HBB gene — 7,300 years ago (259 generations)

There are ten hemoglobin subunit genes in the human genome: HBA1, HBA2, HBB, HBD, HBE1, HBG1, HBG2, HBM, HBQ1 and HBZ. One of the original heritable diseases presented in early genetics textbooks is sickle cell anemia. There are several hereditary … Continue reading

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Three ion channels are able to sense painful heat

This topic is a classic example of GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS. All animals, including humans, “know” when they’re too cold or when they get too hot; they sense these cues/signals from the environment. This includes even microbes that are mobile: they will … Continue reading

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Extensive impact of non-antibiotic drugs on the human microbiome

The attached publication is central to the topic of gene-environment interactions. Beneficial bacteria (and perhaps a few viruses and fungi) — which normally inhabit our bodies — has been termed “the microbiome.” Although the microbiome has largely been overlooked (except … Continue reading

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Identification of sewage sludge bacteria that forms the hydrocarbon, toluene

The metabolic diversity of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) –– combined with ready access to increasingly efficient and less costly DNA-sequencing technologies –– has led to the challenge of unambiguously defined enzymes that have not yet been associated with specific genes … Continue reading

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