Author Archives: DWN

Endophytes Help Poplar Trees Clean up Trichloroethylene (TCE)

This article (from the Superfund Diary this month) should be of interest to some of you. It turns out that a symbiotic microbe, living in the cells of poplar trees, is capable of very efficiently degrading a known human carcinogen, … Continue reading

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Previously unappreciated form of cell-to-cell communication might be related to prions and may participate in cancer metastasis and infections

Scientists know that some cells build wire-like extensions as a kind of temporary foothold to move themselves from place to place. But these “extensions” might in fact be involved in something far more complex [see attached article]. In 1999, cell … Continue reading

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After 13 years of planetary exploration, Cassini was programmed to crash into Saturn’s atmosphere

Although this article [attached] is not exactly on the topic of “gene-environment interactions,” the Cassini Project should boggle the mind of anyone interested in science, as well as astronomy or reading Sci-Fi books. In mid-September, after 13 years of solar … Continue reading

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RE: The monarch butterfly’s epic 3,000-mile migration

Dear Doron, The article I sent was describing a professor at Univ of Cincinnati, but I can’t say that his research was any “big breakthrough” in the field. Hundreds of biologists have studied this migratory phenomenon for decades. I recall … Continue reading

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Inactivation of a pig retrovirus using CRISPR/Cas9, which will improve success at pig organ transplants in humans

CRISPR/Cas9 is an efficient relatively quick method of gene-editing, and a use of this technique in farmyard animals is shown herein. Previous papers shared by GEITP emails included CRISPR/Cas technology employed in laboratory animals, human clinical experiments, plants of agricultural … Continue reading

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No paper? No problem. Some of these “predatory online open-access journals” willll actually help you write a paper or will add your name as coauthor …!!

As we’ve discussed in these GEITP pages a number of times before, approximately 15,000 “predatory online open-access journals” have popped up during these past 6-8 years, with their primary goal to make a lot of money –– whether or not … Continue reading

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Why do redheaded people have increased risk of maglignant melanoma ??

Of special interest to Zalfa Abdel-Malik, melanocyte cells in the skin and hair follicles make a pigment called melanin, and these cells can give rise to the deadly skin cancer mela­noma. Melanin protects the skin against ultraviolet (UV) radiation from … Continue reading

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Circadian Biology Scientists Win Nobel Prize

This year’s Nobel award is thoroughly focused on the theme of Gene-Environment Interactions. 🙂 The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been jointly awarded to Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young for their work on circadian rhythms. … Continue reading

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Strong evidence of an epigenetic effect on mRNA that modulates hematopoietic stem cell fate and progenitor cell specification

In previous GEITP emails, we have emphasized the importance of genetics, epigenetic effects, AND environmental factors –– all contributing to a phenotype (trait) –– whether the trait is a complex disease, drug efficacy or toxicity, or some metric (quantitative measurement) … Continue reading

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DNA surgery on embryos removes disease

This article is from BBC News this morning. DNA surgery on embryos removes disease By James Gallagher, BBC News · 28 September 2017 Precise “chemical surgery” has been performed on human embryos to remove disease A research team at Sun … Continue reading

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