Monthly Archives: January 2019

Distinguishing “genetic correlation” from “causation” — across 52 diseases and complex traits

Okay, this topic is a bit intense (dense?), so stay with me on this one. The topic has to do with pleiotropy — when a gene, or a variant of one gene, causes two or more phenotypes (traits). This phenomenon … Continue reading

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Whole-genome sequencing of 175 Mongolians uncovers population-specific genetic architecture and gene flow throughout North and East Asia

From time to time, these GEITP pages focus on the evolution of modern human, including the Great Diaspora (i.e. several waves of Homo sapiens originating in southeast Africa and migrating to Asia and Europe, along with some ‘back-migrations’). As humans … Continue reading

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Mitochondrial genetic medicine. A Perspective by Doug Wallace

Doug Wallace is a pioneer of the mitochondrial genome. I first met him at Stanford in the late 1970s and tried several times to entice him to speak at the Univ of Cincinnati in the 1990s and 2000s (never happened, … Continue reading

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The Perfect Dose

This GEITP emailing is a bit unusual because it is a recommendation of a book on the topic of “gene-environment interactions.” Right here in the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, we have a physician-scientist –– who somehow has “enough … Continue reading

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