Monthly Archives: December 2018

Gut microbiota diversity across ethnicities in the United States

Just appearing this month in PloS Biol [see attached 2nd article], this article is consistent with what our GEITP pages have been describing the last several days. The human gut microbiome is known to vary extensively between individuals, and this … Continue reading

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How the gut microbiome responds to immigration from one continent to another

The topic today is a pretty cool example of gene-environment interactions. As these GEITP pages have discussed before, the bacteria in our gut (comprising each individual’s ‘MICROBIOME’) account for ~92% of all “our” DNA (i.e. just 8% of DNA is … Continue reading

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Neonicotinoid exposure affects social behavior of bees

As most of us have heard repeatedly over the past 10+ years, something is affecting pollinator-bee survival. This is clearly a topic for these GEITP pages (i.e. gene-environment interactions). Bees are critical contributors to agricultural crop production — as well … Continue reading

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Ancient DNA tracks migrations around the Americas

Previous GEITP pages have noted that ancestral Amerindians had diverged from Siberian and East Asian populations around 25,000 ± 1100 years ago, followed by a split (divergence of ancestral Amerindians from Ancient Beringians) between 22,000 and 18,000 years ag). Subsequently, … Continue reading

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