Monthly Archives: November 2018

COMMENT: Dear Dr. Nebert, I would say that this publication is an “important article.” It has been highlighted in many news reports and scientific conferences –– including last month’s Amercan Society of Human Genetics meeting in San Diego. I think … Continue reading

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Dynamic interplay visualized — between enhancer/promoter regions and gene activity

Transcriptional enhancers are short DNA fragments [5 base-pairs (bp) to 25-30 bp] that control gene expression; enhancers can be nearby “upstream” or “downstream”, inside the gene (in an intron that does not get transcribed into the final messenger RNA which … Continue reading

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Genome-wide polygenic scores for common diseases identify individuals with risk eequivalent to monogenic mutations

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) began more than 12 years ago, with the hope that clinical geneticists would soon be able to [a] predict genetic risk of complex diseases, and [b] find new pathways for which new drugs might be developed … Continue reading

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The American Journal of Human Genetics: November 1, 2018 (Volume 103, Issue 5)

Although everything is a gradient, complex genetic diseases (e.g. obesity, type-2 diabetes, schizophrenia, and cancer) and quantitative traits (e.g. height, body mass index, and I.Q.) usually differ from monogenic traits and diseases (e.g. phenylketonuria, sickle-cell anemia, and tyrosinemia). Traits (phenotypes) … Continue reading

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Last universal common ancestor (LUCA) between ancient Earth chemistry and the onset of genetics

There was a time when there was no life on Earth (i.e. only the environment). And there was a time when there were DNA-inheriting cells (i.e. there were gene-environment interactions). Transitioning from the former to the latter is difficult to … Continue reading

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OTX2 restricts the number of primordial germ cells “allowed to enter” into the mouse germline

Primordial germ cells (i.e. the precursors of eggs and sperm) are established very early in the development of many multicellular organ­isms; reasons for this are unknown. This process of establishing the germline involves both: [a] preventing a nonreproductive-cell (somatic-cell) fate; … Continue reading

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Vitamin K2 Steps into the Spotlight for Bone and Heart Health

This article came out recently online at Medscape.com –– and I believe many will be interested in the advances being made concerning our understanding of Vitamin K nutrition, and bone and cardiac health. DwN Vitamin K2 Steps into the Spotlight … Continue reading

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The Next Big Thing in Health is Your Exposome and KEEPING IN MIND AVOGADRO’S NUMBER

The article [below] just appeared online, at Medium.com/theNewNew/. Many different feelings surfaced –– when I read this. First, “exposome” is yet-another catchy buzzword for what many environmental toxicologists have been doing for decades (without having this cute name). But everything … Continue reading

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HGNC Newsletter Autumn 2018

For those interested, below is pasted that autumn 2o18 NewsLetter of the Human Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC). The https://www.genenames.org/ website not only includes standardized nomenclature for all human genes and genetic loci to date –– but also does the same … Continue reading

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An archaebacterium that expresses actin protein — a trait thought to be eukaryotie-specific

From time to time, these GEITP pages consider topics on Evolution. In biology, there are six Kingdoms of Life: Archaebacteria, Eubacteria, Protists, Fungi, Plants and Animals. The first two are prokaryotes (microscopic single-celled organisms having unpaired chromosomes and neither a … Continue reading

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