Monthly Archives: October 2018

Genetics and academic success at university

From time to time, these GEITP pages feature one or another genome-wide association study (GWAS). A genotype-phenotype association can be virtually anything that the scientific group decides to study. In the present case, genes [examining several million single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on Genetics and academic success at university

When Adolescents Give Up Pot, Their Cognition Quickly Improves

This article [yesterday on the National Public Radio (NPR) web site] just confirms further what some have been saying about Cannabis (marijuana; most active ingredient is tetrahydrocannabinol) for at least the past decade. First, there was evidence in mice, then … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on When Adolescents Give Up Pot, Their Cognition Quickly Improves

Ancestral polymorphisms explain the role of chromosomal inversions in speciation (when a new species is created)

Charles Darwin was among the first to recognize that –– if a species separates into two geographically distinct niches and undergoes a sufficient number of generations –– the two separate groups will become independent species, no longer able to breed … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on Ancestral polymorphisms explain the role of chromosomal inversions in speciation (when a new species is created)

Molecular archaeoparasitology identifies cultural changes in the Medieval Era

Intestinal parasites have afflicted humans throughout history and remain common in parts of the developing world. Prior to today’s improvements in hygiene and medicine, gut parasites during the 18th century were prevalent throughout the world, which makes them an intriguing … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on Molecular archaeoparasitology identifies cultural changes in the Medieval Era

The feasibility of asbestos bioremediation

If the topic in these Superfund Research Program (SRP) monthly summaries falls within “bioremediation,” these GEITP pages believe this is close enough to ‘gene-environment interactions’ to warrant the summary as an important, exciting, and valuable teaching item. DwN Siderophores Reduce … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on The feasibility of asbestos bioremediation

Molecular regulation of carcinogenesis

This brief review [see attached] is a very crisp and excellent article, summarizing the fundamental causes of and treatments for the process of carcinogenesis. For what it’s worth, one of the coauthors is my scientific child (FJG), and two of … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on Molecular regulation of carcinogenesis

Joachim Ronneberg Dies at Age 99

J By Robert D. McFadden · Oct. 22, 2018 The Norwegian saboteurs skied across the Telemark pine forest in winter whites, phantom apparitions gliding over moonlit snow. They halted at a steep river gorge and gazed down at a humming … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on Joachim Ronneberg Dies at Age 99

Fake News Comes to Academia

Not one, but two, of GEITP’s faithful readers contributed this article [from the Wall Street Journal, online Tues evening Oct 2nd, out in print Wed Oct 3rd] –– suggesting to me that I share this with all GEITP email recipients. … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on Fake News Comes to Academia

Evolution of carcinogenesis

For those interested in cancer and, specifically, the history of cancer, you might find this brief fascinating review [attached] of interest. And for any of you who might not look at the South African Journal of Science on a regular … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on Evolution of carcinogenesis

Phenotype-Specific Enrichment of Mendelian Disorder Genes near GWAS Regions across 62 Complex Traits

The genetic architecture (defined as the underlying genetic basis of any disease-related or quantitative trait and its variability seen in any population studied) of human traits have traditionally been classified into two major categories: complex traits arising from many low-effect … Continue reading

Posted in Center for Environmental Genetics | Comments Off on Phenotype-Specific Enrichment of Mendelian Disorder Genes near GWAS Regions across 62 Complex Traits