Monthly Archives: April 2018

Three ion channels are able to sense painful heat

This topic is a classic example of GENE-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS. All animals, including humans, “know” when they’re too cold or when they get too hot; they sense these cues/signals from the environment. This includes even microbes that are mobile: they will … Continue reading

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Extensive impact of non-antibiotic drugs on the human microbiome

The attached publication is central to the topic of gene-environment interactions. Beneficial bacteria (and perhaps a few viruses and fungi) — which normally inhabit our bodies — has been termed “the microbiome.” Although the microbiome has largely been overlooked (except … Continue reading

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Identification of sewage sludge bacteria that forms the hydrocarbon, toluene

The metabolic diversity of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) –– combined with ready access to increasingly efficient and less costly DNA-sequencing technologies –– has led to the challenge of unambiguously defined enzymes that have not yet been associated with specific genes … Continue reading

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Further fine-tuning of the genetic history of more recent Neaderthals

These GEITP pages have often discussed the evolution of modern human species and their migrations Out of Africa. In Southeast Asia, Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) diverged from the modern human (Homo sapiens) lineage ~600,000 years ago. This diagram (shared previously on … Continue reading

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“Sweet Tooth” Allele of the FGF21 Gene Is Associated with Less Body Fat

This article is from The Scientist this past week. First is the lay summary. Below is the scientific summary from the Cell Rep publication. One question that immediately formed in my mind is that “body shape” is different for various … Continue reading

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Lowered-calorie diet shows promising signs of slowing the aging process: clinical trial

There have been a number of trials in laboratory animals –– the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is the best example, but some work has also been carried out in flies and mice –– showing that caloric restriction extends the animal’s longevity … Continue reading

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Recognition of one form of melanin by a lectin receptor is required fof immunity against Aspergillus

“Melanins” refer to a group of pigments containing indoles (and other intermediary products) derived from tyrosine oxidation. Melanin is widely distributed in the animal and plant kingdoms, and in vertebrates (animals having a spine) melanins are the major pigment present … Continue reading

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The very mysterious ailment, myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), is more common than one might think

I welcome the suggestion (M. Sharpe et al. Nature 554, p. 31; 2018) that patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis (also known as chronic fatigue syndrome; ME/CFS) should not be dismissed out of hand. However, as someone who has been diagnosed with … Continue reading

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Comparing landscape mutations and progression of childhood tumors vs adult tumors

The recent advances in whole-exome sequencing (WES) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) –– with increasingly efficient and lower costs –– has led to studies such as these cancer-screening analyses presented here [attached]. In the main article (page 321), authors examined sequences … Continue reading

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As much as 40 percent of direct-to-consumer DNA tests are wrong

As much as 40 percent of direct-to-consumer DNA tests are wrong 2 April 2018 By Carl Velasco; Tech Times A new study calls to question the accuracy of at-home DNA testing kits marketed by a number of popular genetics brands. … Continue reading

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