Monthly Archives: April 2016

Maternal inheritance associated with higher mutant RB1 expression than paternal inheritance

Retinoblastoma (Rb), the most common pediatric intra-ocular malignancy, results from inactivation of both alleles of the RB1 tumor suppressor gene. The second allele is most commonly lost, as demonstrated by loss of heterozygosity studies. RB1 germline carriers usually develop bilateral … Continue reading

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Evidence now for at least five admixture breedings among Neanderthal, Denisovian and Modern human lineages

It has been established for several years that small portions of the European and Asian genomes are derived from Neaderthals, a subline that was “not successful” and therefore “died out” at least 28,000 years ago. This most recent report [attached] … Continue reading

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IRP2 in mitochondria required for accumulation of toxic levels of iron in cigarette smokers having COPD

Just like almost every other disease (except for Mendelian autosomal or recessive disorders), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is linked to both cigarette smoking and genetic determinants. Iron-responsive element–binding protein-2 (IRP2) was previusly identified as an important COPD susceptibility gene. … Continue reading

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How are new species formed? And when do we call a new subline a “new species”?

How are new species formed? And when do we call a newly diverged subline a “new species”? Clearly, the environment strongly influences selection and promotion of certain genes and allelic forms over others. Concepts and definitions of species have been … Continue reading

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Ancient femur sample pinpoints time near origin of Neaderthals as 430,000 years ago

The ancestry of “modern humans” is becoming increasingly complex … with each new publication of DNA sequencing from some small bone chip or other fossil from long ago. When modern humans spread out of Africa and the Near East (about … Continue reading

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