Monthly Archives: January 2016

Intriguing study: icocitrate dehydrogenase-1 serves to derepress an oncogene (!!)

In the late 2000’s it was discovered that mutations in IDH1, the gene encoding the enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase-1, are often associated with glioma, the most common form of brain cancer. This finding was quite unexpected and tantalizing. The IDH1 pro¬≠tein … Continue reading

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Behavioral learning deficit induced by benzo[a]pyrene in utero

Clinical epidemiological studies have implicated central nervous system problems (especially related to memory, learning) associated with exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a contaminant found in the environment and especially in fish from polluted waters. benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is another AHR ligand. … Continue reading

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Regulation of aquaporin-3 by the AHR pathway: critical for cell migration

AHR (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) is a transcription factor activated by innumerable foreign chemicals (“signals”). as well as by endogenous chemicals such as some in the lipid mediator (LM) second-messenger pathway. Down-regulation or ablation of AHR causes many irregularities in many … Continue reading

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+ Delineating “complex disease spectrums” into subclasses should help refine genotype-phenotype associations

On the other side of the equation (from studying genetic architecture of schizophrenia as a multifactorial trait), this paper [attached] describes the importance or relevance of attempting to subdivide the broad spectrum of parkinsonian disorders (i.e. defining phenotypic architecture of … Continue reading

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Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians

Ancient DNA makes it possible to observe natural selection directly by analyzing samples from populations before, during, and after adaptation events. In the attached paper, authors report a genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest ancient … Continue reading

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Fast variance-components analysis to compare/contrast genetic architectures of several complex diseases

Heritability analyses of genome-wide association study (GWAS) cohorts have yielded important insights into complex disease architecture, and increasing sample sizes hold the promise of further discoveries. The phenotype of the complex disease schizophrenia is most likely not that different from … Continue reading

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